Category Archives: What to Read

Weekend Writing Prompt: Safety First

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Happy Writing!

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What to Read: Before the Devil Breaks You

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Before the Devil Breaks You by Libba Bray


Summary

In the aftermath of the sleeping sickness that nearly overtook New York, the Diviners are forced further into the open amidst increasing rumors of ghosts in the city. United, the Diviners pursue the secrets behind the origin of their powers. Their search takes them deep into the folds of demonic deals, government conspiracies, and the brutal truths of America’s past. But the tide of popularity is beginning to turn against them, and in a time of growing modernism and socio-economic turmoil, they may be under threat from both the living and the dead.

Overall Impressions

Compared to its sisters, the third installment of The Diviners is much, much darker. Its plot and characters are as winsome as ever. That said, don’t expect the same comedic breaks as the first two installments. With its engaging ghost-story narrative and poignant take on the bloody history of the “American Dream,” Before the Devil Breaks You is another poetic nail-biter, if a bit emotionally exhausting. I loved seeing the now fully-assembled Diviners came into their own as equals, friends, and rivals. The shifts in alliances and romantic interests were delightfully shocking, and the plot kept perfect pace. Bray has once again delivered with this energetic, suspenseful, and beautifully haunting novel. I recommend it for fans of YA supernatural stories and related genres.

Happy reading!

(A note of warning: Although this book is YA, it includes some instances of domestic abuse and other graphic scenes that may not be suitable for younger readers or those who are triggered by related violence.)

 

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What to Read: Lair of Dreams

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Lair of Dreams by Libba Bray


Summary

In this electric second installment of The DivinersEvie O’Neill has stolen the spotlight in New York City, dazzling audiences with her supernatural ability to read secrets held in personal objects. But Evie is not the only Diviner, and the others aren’t as keen on being made public–others like dream walkers Henry DuBois and Ling Chan. Meanwhile, an inexplicable sleeping sickness ravages the city. Dangerous nightmares are taking hold, and it’s going to take a lot more than a warm glass of milk to chase them away.

Overall Impressions

It’s not easy for a book to scare me in full daylight, but Lair of Dreams did it. Another beautifully voiced volume by Bray, this sequel kept a fast-paced balance of everything I loved about the first Diviners–ominous monsters, villains that are disconcertingly human, dramatic irony so thick I wanted to smack the characters with their own book, and heartbreakingly witty romance, all set against the backdrop of 1920s New York. The sequel definitely highlights more romantic subplots than its predecessor. Still, it nailed the mark in keeping to its dark, paranormal roots. I kept finding myself sitting in bed at night, knowing that if I read anymore I’d probably have nightmares, but still itching for one more chapter.

Happy reading!

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What to Read: Strange the Dreamer

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Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor


Summary

Fairytales may be old, but they are no less powerful for it. A bookish nobody plucked from the dust of Zosma’s great library, Lazlo Strange joins a party of delegates chosen by the legendary Godslayer of Weep. Weep, a city thats true name was stolen from the minds of the world. A city Lazlo continued to believe in even after it had become a fairytale to everyone else. Going on blind faith, the delegation aims to solve the dark mystery that has haunted Weep since the Godslayer earned his name during the Carnage. A shadow on Weep’s history that must be seen to be believed.

Overall Impressions

First and maybe most importantly, I would like to give this book the “shiniest cover I have ever experienced” award. The cover art is as lovely as its content. True to form, Taylor writes prose like poetry. The plot is a little slow to start, but Lazlo’s charm and his author’s narrative keeps it moving smoothly. It has the kind of finesse that can only be achieved by an avid lover of fairytales, and it was easy to image Taylor sitting beside me, telling the story as if she’d seen it first hand. My biggest critique of the book is it’s length, which resulted in a little bit of excessive repetition when there were shifts in the narrative point of view. Otherwise, Laini Taylor has once again solidified her place as one of my favorite fantasy writers. I recommend this book for admirers of myths, legends, and all other forms of literary fantasy. Long live the dreamers.

Happy reading!

Other recommended series by Laini Taylor:

Daughter of Smoke and Bone 

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What to Read: The Flats

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The Flats by Kate Birdsall


Summary

A dead boy. A cast of deadbeat suspects. A detective determined to root out the killer. Detective Liz Boyle’s hunt for a child murderer sends her reeling when someone she cares about becomes entangled in the web of confusion surrounding a little boy’s death. But just when the case seems synched, a faceless new player slips onto the scene, and Boyle must decide how hard she is willing to push herself and those around her to find justice.

Overall Impressions

Detective Liz Boyle and her partner Goran are the kind of crime-fighting team I’d want on my side. The Flats is full of solid characters, but Boyle and Goran were by far my favorite duo. Birdsall’s tight writing style and classic cop narrative easily ushers readers into Boyle’s world of crime. There are few times when the narrative slows the action, but nine times out of ten Birdsall balances action and dialogue with narrative beautifully. She swings smoothly between Detective Boyle’s personal and professional life as the line between the two become increasingly blurred over the course of the book. The plot itself is self-propelling as Boyle’s investigation leads her down a sinister rabbit hole. I enjoyed the twists and turns that Birdsall sprinkles throughout the book, and the subtle clues that all lead up to a suspenseful climax and satisfactory ending. I recommend The Flats for lovers of mystery, detective dramas, and realistic fiction. And good news — if you like The Flats, it’s only the first book in the Detective Liz Boyle series!

Happy reading!

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What to Read: Annihilation

Before it hits theaters in 2018, catch up on:

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Annihilation by Jeff Vandermeer


 

Summary

Four scientists enter Area X, drawn by their need for discovery. They are not the first group to undertake this exploratory mission. Previous expeditions have died of illness, gone missing, and devolved into murder. Readers join the twelfth expedition as Area X quickly begins to take it’s toll, eating away at the trust and minds of the expedition members, twisting the meaning of reality.

Overall Impressions

A biologist, a surveyor, a psychologist, and an archeologist walk into a bar…and by bar I mean a creepy, nature-ruled limbo where logic is rendered useless. Vandermeer landscapes an exciting and utterly unnerving tale of exploration. Guided by his scientific style of writing, I could feel the characters’ fear and confusion as their realities unraveled with each new discovery. I recommend this book for lovers of the strange, of apocalyptic fiction, and of mind-bending worlds.

Happy reading!

P.S. Find the movie trailer here.

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What to Read: Bird Box

Looking for a creepy read this fall? Try:

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Bird Box by Josh Malerman


 

Summary

There’s something out there…and all it takes is a glance for it to kill you. Newly pregnant in a rapidly devolving world, Malorie seeks safety in a house with fellow survivors while, outside, people are going mad. Dying. Anyone brave enough to look outside could be infected by this unknown menace in an instant. But Malorie and her friends can’t stay inside forever.

Overall Impressions

Holy crap. Right up there with Pen Pal, this book had me racing between pages with anticipation. The dramatic irony is strong with this one, and it’s to die for (sorry…kind of). Suspenseful, dark, and utterly chilling, lovers of horror found in the unknown will love walking the psychological high-wire that is Bird Box. (Also, this author hails from Michigan, my home state!) It has a style that flows like contemporary and reads like old-school literature. I recommended this for adult readers.

Happy reading!

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What to Read: The Outsiders

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The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton


 

Summary

Revisit the classic, or experience it for the first time. The Outsiders is the story of Ponyboy and his gang of Greasers, and the consequences of a social rivalry taken too far. On the run, Ponyboy must face the wider world outside of his familiar streets. Then when further tragedy strikes, he must decide what type of man he wants to be — the kind who takes to the fight, or the kind who would have the heart to stop it.

Overall Impressions

This was my first time reading The Outsiders, and I can’t believe it took me this long to get to it. It’s easy to see why it’s such a long-withstanding title. Easy to read but incredibly thoughtful, I loved the themes of brotherhood and sympathy that permeated the book. It captures the frustrations and hope of every young adult as they begin to realize that not everyone sees the world as they see it. That everybody’s hurting and loving in some way, and all it can take to mend the gap is a small change in perspective. I recommend this for readers middle school and older.

Happy Reading, and stay gold!

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What to Read: Penpal

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Penpal by Dathan Auerbach


Summary

Bad memories aren’t the only thing that can follow you. This incredible reddit.com thread turned published novel pieces together the eerie memories of a man trying to unravel the mysteries of his childhood. It seems those closest to him have something to hide, but the truth is more terrible than he ever knew.

Overall Impressions

Take a moment to imagine me cradling this book to my chest in sheer wonder that someone was able to gather so much online support for an idea that he was able to make it into a real, pull-it-from-a-shelf book.

That, ladies and gentlemen, is the power of a story. (And the internet.)

But on to the book! Warning: It is not for the faint of heart. More than once I found myself holding my breath with dread and anticipation….in public….in the middle of the day. It’s that good. The story is a series of non-linear snapshots woven together with dramatic irony so thick I wanted to karate chop my way through it to warn the characters–a classic case of “Don’t open that door! Don’t go in there!”. While there is room for polishing, the writing style is relatable yet gripping. I recommend this book for adult readers who like suspense, drama, and skin-crawly crime stories.

Happy Reading!

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What to Read: The Age of Miracles

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The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker


 

Summary

No one predicted the slowing of the Earth’s rotation. For Julia, the weight of the consequences are felt in hindsight as she reflects on her sixth grade year, that first year of “the slowing”. Some people adapted better than others. While the days grow longer, communities crumble like sugar, and relationships shift, life goes on. But for how long?

Overall Impressions

It’s funny how in the midst of catastrophe, some parts of life plod on unimpeded. Like the ups and down of being eleven, or having a crush, or realizing adults don’t have all the answers either. It’s a rough transition, even without environmental disaster. Walker beautifully captures a classic coming-of-age story against a tragic backdrop. Her imagery is sharp, her points subtle, and her protagonist relatable to anyone who remembers (or is currently experiencing) the unstable years of upper adolescence. Definitely not a light-hearted summer read, but one I recommend YA readers add to their lists.

*Shout-out to my cousin, Zachary, who recommended the book.

Happy Reading!

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