Category Archives: What to Read

What to Read: The Outsiders

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The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton


 

Summary

Revisit the classic, or experience it for the first time. The Outsiders is the story of Ponyboy and his gang of Greasers, and the consequences of a social rivalry taken too far. On the run, Ponyboy must face the wider world outside of his familiar streets. Then when further tragedy strikes, he must decide what type of man he wants to be — the kind who takes to the fight, or the kind who would have the heart to stop it.

Overall Impressions

This was my first time reading The Outsiders, and I can’t believe it took me this long to get to it. It’s easy to see why it’s such a long-withstanding title. Easy to read but incredibly thoughtful, I loved the themes of brotherhood and sympathy that permeated the book. It captures the frustrations and hope of every young adult as they begin to realize that not everyone sees the world as they see it. That everybody’s hurting and loving in some way, and all it can take to mend the gap is a small change in perspective. I recommend this for readers middle school and older.

Happy Reading, and stay gold!

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What to Read: Penpal

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Penpal by Dathan Auerbach


Summary

Bad memories aren’t the only thing that can follow you. This incredible reddit.com thread turned published novel pieces together the eerie memories of a man trying to unravel the mysteries of his childhood. It seems those closest to him have something to hide, but the truth is more terrible than he ever knew.

Overall Impressions

Take a moment to imagine me cradling this book to my chest in sheer wonder that someone was able to gather so much online support for an idea that he was able to make it into a real, pull-it-from-a-shelf book.

That, ladies and gentlemen, is the power of a story. (And the internet.)

But on to the book! Warning: It is not for the faint of heart. More than once I found myself holding my breath with dread and anticipation….in public….in the middle of the day. It’s that good. The story is a series of non-linear snapshots woven together with dramatic irony so thick I wanted to karate chop my way through it to warn the characters–a classic case of “Don’t open that door! Don’t go in there!”. While there is room for polishing, the writing style is relatable yet gripping. I recommend this book for adult readers who like suspense, drama, and skin-crawly crime stories.

Happy Reading!

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What to Read: The Age of Miracles

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The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker


 

Summary

No one predicted the slowing of the Earth’s rotation. For Julia, the weight of the consequences are felt in hindsight as she reflects on her sixth grade year, that first year of “the slowing”. Some people adapted better than others. While the days grow longer, communities crumble like sugar, and relationships shift, life goes on. But for how long?

Overall Impressions

It’s funny how in the midst of catastrophe, some parts of life plod on unimpeded. Like the ups and down of being eleven, or having a crush, or realizing adults don’t have all the answers either. It’s a rough transition, even without environmental disaster. Walker beautifully captures a classic coming-of-age story against a tragic backdrop. Her imagery is sharp, her points subtle, and her protagonist relatable to anyone who remembers (or is currently experiencing) the unstable years of upper adolescence. Definitely not a light-hearted summer read, but one I recommend YA readers add to their lists.

*Shout-out to my cousin, Zachary, who recommended the book.

Happy Reading!

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What to Read: Comic Books

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Let’s talk comics! I don’t usually cover entire mediums/genres in What to Read posts, but since I’m a fairly new comic book reader, I thought it might be nice to have a bit of a shoutout to the medium as a whole. Superheroes aren’t the only topics covered in comics, but they’re certainly the most memorable, and in recent years have been given a huge cinematic boost by the release of some of DC and Marvel’s biggest hitters (*cough* shameless plug for Wonder Woman, coming June 2 *cough*).

So, comics. If you’re not already a fan of comic books then it might be hard to see an immediate appeal. I’ve been there. But I’ve always been curious, and after taking a college course focusing on Batman, Superman, and the reconfigurations of mythology, I am hooked. Whether you like superheroes or not, we can’t deny the enormous role they play in history and culture. I mean, our superheroes were essentially born as a creative response to the political and cultural atmosphere surrounding World War II. Our most beloved heroes encapsulate our history and continue the myths and legends so deeply ingrained in our society that we may not notice at first glance.

At the same time, comics can be confusing because they don’t always follow a linear, concrete plot. That’s also part of the beauty of them. Admittedly, it’s something I’m still getting used to, but in the hands of each new writer and artist characters like Iron Man and Supergirl evolve, their stories shift, and they come to reflect the hopes of each new generation. (And to kick some serious ass.) Of course, what comics teach us most is that it is not just power that saves the day. It is the heart behind the fist, the hope beneath the despair. These are the stories that show us that people can be horrible, but more importantly that they can be incredible.

Happy Reading!

(A few recommendations from a newbie…)

  • Superman: Red Son by Mark Millar
  • Superman: For Tomorrow by Brian Azzarello
  • Batman: The Long Halloween by Jeph Loeb
  • Batman: The Return of Bruce Wayne by Grant Morrison
  • Nightwing by Tim Seeley
  • Batman: The Man Who Laughs by Ed Brubaker
  • Batman & Robin Eternal by Scott Snyder

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What to Read: The Crane Wife

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The Crane Wife by Patrick Ness


Summary

Based on a Japanese fairytale, The Crane Wife follows George Duncan, a man resigned to abuse by life and love because of his kind nature. Then, one night, an injured crane appears in his backyard. Soon after saving the crane, a mysterious artist enters his life, inviting him to take part in her latest project. Things finally seem to be falling into place for George, but beneath the surface of the everyday a dark and ancient story is unfurling. One of lore, love, and loss.

Overall Impressions

Through shifting perspectives, Patrick Ness poetically captures the paradox of what it means to love. (I know, bear with me.) The story moves easily between George’s life and the embedded myth, eventually merging into one narrative that spans fantasy and reality. A fantasy lover, I found myself drawn primarily to the myth portions. That said, less fantasy-inclined readers should be prepared to exercise their suspension of disbelief. Though “a little trippy”, as described by the friend who recommended it to me, the book’s strangeness ultimately translates in a relatable way. The best way I can think to describe it is whimsically noir. Take it as you will. I recommend The Crane Wife for adult readers who enjoy romance and magical realism/fantasy genres.

Happy Reading!

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What to Read: Red Seas Under Red Skies

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Red Seas Under Red Skies by Scott Lynch


Summary

Having narrowly escaped their previous caper in Camorr, a battered Locke Lamora and Jean Tannen strike out for Tal Verrar, home of the infamous gambling house, the Sinspire, for what could be their biggest con yet. But nothing is ever simple for these daring thieves. When plans go array, Locke and Jean find themselves embroiled in a feud between powerful parties and hunted by others unknown. The pair escaped Camorr with their lives, but Tal Verrar may not be so generous.

Overall Impressions

A perfect compliment to The Lies of Locke Lamora. This sequel maintains the suspense and laugh-out-loud wit as its original, propelled by the lovably incorrigible energy of its characters. Locke and Jean return as one of my favorite con artist/old married couple duos, and Captain Drakasha is the pirate queen we all aspire to be. Dark, though less edgy than the first installment, I loved riding along side the Gentlemen Bastards on another “insane misadventure”. Lynch easily weaves old threads of plot with the new, and once again has readers ready to follow the Thorn of Camorr to hell and back. Recommended for adult readers of fantasy and adventure.

Happy Reading!

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What to Read: Daughter of Smoke & Bone

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Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor


Summary

Art student Karou’s double-life has long been filled with dark magic and strange beasts. Yet her place among her adoptive, inhuman family has always been a mystery. When supernatural events begin to occur around the world, Karou finds herself alone and thrust into the makings of a war. A run-in with one of the angel-like Akiva only leaves her with more questions. Unsure who to trust, Karou must discover the deadly past that has led her present, and face an uncertain future.

Overall Impressions

Gorgeously written, this is one of my favorite YA fantasy series. After book one I gleefully tore through the rest of the series. The characters are highly developed and charming, and I always appreciate books with a strong female lead. Taylor constructed an equally dark and fantastical world to compliment her characters. Suspenseful and romantic, her writing balances a quick-paced plot with elegant style. I recommend the series for lovers of YA fantasy.

Happy Reading!

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What to Read: Ahsoka

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Ahsoka by E.K. Johnston


Summary

Forced into hiding in the aftermath of Order 66, Ahsoka Tano has so far managed to escape the hands of the Empire. She lives a life of necessity until circumstances send her on the run again, leading her to a place where giving up her nomadic and lonely life may just be possible. Of course, nothing is ever so simple. With her new home under threat, Ahsoka must decide how far she is willing to go to protect what little she has left.

Overall Impressions

As a life-long Star Wars fan, I was over the moon (…space humor? No? Fair enough…) when I found this book. After the release of Rogue One, I was dying to get my hands on additional Star Wars stories. This book felt like the literary version of an afternoon snack. While I wouldn’t say it stands alone outside the context of the Clone Wars and Rebels TV series, I did enjoy having Ahsoka back in my life. More classic characters also crop up throughout the book for a satisfying bit of nostalgia. The brisk writing made for a comfortable weekend read, and the plot held to the classic intertwining style of many other Star Wars adventures. I recommend this book for YA sci-fi fans.

Happy Reading!

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What to Read: Dash & Lily’s Book of Dares

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Dash and Lily’s Book of Dares by David Levithan and Rachel Cohn


Summary

A whimsical girl looking for love, Lily leaves a notebook tucked among the shelves of her favorite bookstore; a notebook full of dares for anyone brave enough to accept them. Enter Dash. The pair begin trading anonymous challenges through the notebook, launching them into a comedic, whirlwind romance.

Overall Impressions

A perfect read for Christmas break. Set around Christmas, this funny and heartfelt novel is a part of my personal library. I’ve read it at least three times and it never fails to make me smile. The idea behind this story is beautiful. Beyond the plot, Lily’s enthusiasm is a lovely juxtaposition to Dash’s thoughtful cynicism, their voices clear and equally balanced between shifting viewpoints. I recommend Dash & Lily to anyone looking for a fun and relaxing read this holiday season.

Happy Reading!

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What to Read: Ella Minnow Pea

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Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn


Summary

Things are changing on the island of Nollop, where residents pride themselves on a culture of elite language. This valor was passed down to them by Nevin Nollop, inventor of the phrase, “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog,” which contains all 26 letters of the alphabet. A statue containing the phrase was long ago erected in his honor. Now though, letters are falling from the statue, and the island’s council has taken it as a sign. They ban the use of each fallen letter. It is up to Ella and her co-conspirators to fight for their freedom of expression, but will they succeed before the last letters fall?

Overall Impressions 

I absolutely love the concept behind this story. Dunn illustrates the importance of self expression and the consequences of the deterioration of language with satirical accuracy. As each letter fell, I found myself wondering how heartbreaking it would actually be to lose the words I love and use daily. Yet I couldn’t help smiling at the subtle jabs displayed by Ella and her family as they struggled to cope. Admittedly, I’m not a fan of the book’s particular style. Books written as personal letters aren’t usually my jam. Style aside, I enjoyed the message and found it incredibly thought provoking. Honest and original, I would recommend this YA book to all lovers of words and fiction.

Happy Reading!

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