Monthly Archives: December 2015

What to Read

200px-Sandry's_book

Sandry’s Book by Tamora Pierce


Summary

Brought to Winding Circle by a mysterious stranger, four children–a thief, a royal, and two outcasted girls–discover they are much more than they believed themselves to be. When the only place they’ve ever belonged is threatened, they must work together to protect their new home.

Overall Impressions

The book was a charming introduction to the Circle of Magic series, and a good choice for YA fans of light fantasy. I loved the diversity of characters. Each character had unique personalities, backgrounds, and abilities that made their interactions not only entertaining, but genuine. The world they live in is a pleasant blend of reality and magic. Overall, the book is an easy read, though at times it can be a little bit slow.

Happy Reading!

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under What to Read

Merry Christmas!

Merry.jpg

Because of the holidays The Girl will be taking a break this week. Hope everyone enjoys their holiday!

Love,

The Girl

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

One Lovely Blog Award

one-lovely-blog-award.pngA huge thank you to Tiegan at Harbour for nominating Girl Meets Fiction for the One Lovely Blog Award! I’ve had a great time writing and am honored by the nomination. And of course, thanks to my wonderful readers!

The Rules

You must thank the person who nominated you and include a link to their blog. List the rules and display the award. Add seven facts about yourself. Nominate however many other bloggers (this is a fluctuating number for everyone) and let them know about their nomination!

Seven Facts About “The Girl”

  1. I have and will continue to cry over exceptionally written cartoons.
  2. My favorite fairytale has been Rumpelstiltskin ever since I played that tricksy wizard in the second grade play. Nailed it, by the way.
  3. When at home, I drink almost exclusively from mugs because they make me feel simultaneously mysterious and artsy.
  4. I do not like pineapple.
  5. My favorite book is The Night Circus by Erin Morgan.
  6. Books that feature movie covers give me the urge to force-choke people, Darth Vader style.
  7.  I like cat sweaters. Yeah, I’m that person. No shame.

My Nominees

Chosen for being creative, entertaining, and constructed well. Check these blogs out!

Nugget Tales

Abigail Mandley Photography

A Word of Substance

The Ninth Life

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

3 Ideas to Consider While Editing

3 Ideas to Consider While Editing.jpgHaving finished the first legitimate draft of my book, I’ve been spending a lot of time revising and editing. At times, editing can feel like a major drag, especially after pouring so much heart and soul into a piece. It isn’t always fun, but man, is it necessary. That being said, here are three things to keep in mind while editing.

There is No Perfect First Draft

Writers spend a lot of time crafting their stories and deserve to feel proud of their work. An author’s story is his mind-child. But, much like real parents, sometimes it’s easy to slip into a defensive mindset when it comes to critiquing said child. I’ve found myself in this situation more than once with my own stories. It’s important to remember that there is no perfect first draft. With a some edits, a piece can (and probably will) get better.

Consider a Cooling Period

It’s also tempting to plow straight through to edits once a draft is completed (another editing misstep I’ve been guilty of). Sometimes tackling edits right away can be useful, but I’ve found a lot of times I need a cooling off period where I can step away from my work until the initial buzz has worn off. That way it’s easier to be objective about what might need expansion or cutting. Objectivity is key.

Editing is an Opportunity 

Editing can hurt, especially when a writer realizes something they love dearly–a scene, a character, a phrase–just doesn’t fit. But editing doesn’t have to be the enemy. It’s an opportunity to make the work better. There is beauty in the art of subtraction. It’s peels back the outer layers of the story and forces the writer to confront the message she is trying to convey to the audience. It brings us closer to the very heart of the story, and that is what writing is all about.

Happy Writing!

4 Comments

Filed under Girl Meets Fiction

What to Read: The 100

100

The 100 by Kass Morgan


 

Summary

High above Earth’s surface, what remains of humanity survives aboard a network of spaceships. Three centuries after the nuclear fallout that devastated the earth, a hundred juveniles convicted of dangerous crimes are being sent back to the ground. It could be a second chance, but it could also be a death sentence.

Overall Impressions 

A solid choice for lovers of YA science fiction, The 100 follows Clarke, Wells, Bellamy, and Glass as they fight to survive on Earth and above it. Each are haunted by the difficult choices they’ve had to make, and each has a backstory as compelling as the last. I enjoyed Kass’s use of multiple points of view, which added nicely to the suspense of the story. I less enjoyed the focus on romance as a motivational tool, which could be why I favor Bellamy’s storyline, but that’s more of a personal preference. Overall, the book is a fast-paced and easy read, perfect for a lazy weekend.

I’m not normally the type to watch an adaptation before I read the book, but I initially picked up The 100 after feverishly binge watching the television series (which is MIND BLOWING, by the way). The first two seasons are now available on Netflix. If, like me, you met the show before you met the book, I will warn you there are some stark differences. But if you feel the calling, check the book out anyway! And as always…

Happy Reading!

 

Leave a comment

Filed under What to Read

What to Read: Eyes Like Stars

eyeslikestars

Eyes Like Stars (Théâtre Illuminata #1) by Lisa Mantchev


Summary

Bertie Shakespeare Smith grew up parentless inside the Théâtre Illuminata, cared for by the characters of every play ever written, who are bound to the theatre by The Book. But unlike her adoptive family, Bertie isn’t a character (she isn’t even an actress), and her origins are shrouded in mystery. Now, the only family she’s ever known is under threat, and she’ll do almost anything to stop it.

Overall Impressions

Brimming with lovably colorful characters, this book is a personal favorite. I highly recommend it for its wit, drama, and heart.

Happy Reading!

Leave a comment

Filed under What to Read

This Isn’t the End: Killing Characters with Purpose

RIP (1)Every reader has a fictional death they will never get over, from books to movies to television shows. If you have ever mourned a character who was close to your heart, whether it was because of his/her personality, skills, or hotness, I feel your pain. Let us have a moment of silence for our fallen.

And…moment is over, because, if current writing trends have proven anything, it’s that he/she probably isn’t so dead after all. Look at shows like Supernatural, Doctor Who, or Arrow. Characters are continuously killed off and then resurrected by popular demand. Because of this, fictional death has lost its punch.Why worry if the writer has a history of reviving his characters? (I’m looking at you Joss Whedon, you beautiful devil.) Why care about the character’s life if it isn’t finite?

I think the mainstream writing community, television or otherwise, needs to put weight back into the concept of death. If the audience knows there is a good chance a character might come back then, more likely than not, they won’t care if the character dies. After the initial two second shock the emotional tether is broken. Strange as it may seem, I would rather be heartbroken over a character’s death than apathetic about his existence.

So how can we as writers make death more meaningful?

The Wow Factor

It can be fun to kill off characters for the sheer purpose of shocking readers. But just because you can doesn’t mean you should. A character’s death should have purpose, whether it’s to advance the plot or motivate another’s actions. That’s what makes it meaningful. If a writer kills off a character simply for the “wow” factor, or because the character no longer has a purpose, it’s probably a good time to reflect–does that character belong in that story?

Don’t Hesitate

As many a warrior has said, “Kill, or be killed.” Reluctance to kill off a character because they are likable can create a significant stumbling block. If a writer knows his character is going to die, he should think it through, but shouldn’t hesitate because of personal preference. If the character is really that loved and still relevant to the story then it makes sense to keep him on. If not, a writer’s gotta do what a writer’s gotta do. Be strong, my friend.

We’re almost There

So your character is dead, and you know you’ve made the right decision for the good of the story. Now all that’s left is to fight the temptation to bring that sucker back to the land of the fictional living. The more a writer loves her character the more tempting it is to resurrect him, especially in genres like fantasy and sci-fi, which make it easier to do so. To be clear, reviving characters is NOT a bad thing. Becoming predictable is. It’s important for writers to think carefully before bringing a character back to life.

Well, here we are at the end of another post. I hope you find it helpful. Thank you for reading, and as always…

Happy Writing!

Question of the Week: Whose fictional death will YOU never get over? Comments welcome!

2 Comments

Filed under Girl Meets Fiction

What to Read

These titles are sure to please:

inkheart

  1. Inkheart, by Cornelia Funke – Many friends  of mine read this story as kids, but I delved into the magical story of Meggie and her father more recently. Meggie’s father, Mo, has the unique ability to “read” characters from the pages of books (which is TOTALLY in my top ten favorite superpowers). But not all of the characters released into the real world are heroes, and a certain villain has finally found Meggie and Mo. An absolutely wonderful concept and enchanting read.beautyqueens
  2. Beauty Queens, by Libba Bray – This intriguing comedy begs the question: What happens when thirteen beauty queen contestants crash-land on an island in the middle of nowhere? Follow the girls as they struggle to survive the island, each other, and the ideals of being beautiful. (Also by Libba Bray: The Diviners)

Happy Reading!

Leave a comment

Filed under What to Read